Grandmother with Alzheimer’s sings Japanese children’s song to infant granddaughter

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A touching moment between a grandmother with Alzheimer’s and her infant granddaughter has gone viral, after the woman’s daughter captured her soothing the baby with a Japanese children’s song. Christine Stone, whose mother Setsuko Harmon was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s eight years ago, said she had to remind her mother daily that she was going to be a grandmother throughout her pregnancy.  

 “It was a fun time,” Christine Stone, 39, told ABC News. “It was exciting to watch her reaction every time I’d tell her.”

Stone gave birth to Sadie Mae on Oct. 11, and later shared that the infant was diagnosed with Achondroplasia, which will require physical therapy.

MARRIAGE LINKED TO LOWER DEMENTIA RISK

“So today, we found out that our Sadie has Achondroplasia… she will be a little person,” Stone posted on Nov. 9. “The average height for a female with this condition is 4 foot 1 inch. We will have to see a few extra doctors and participate in some therapy throughout her growing years… she will take a little longer to sit up, crawl and walk but that will come with time. Other than the physical disabilities associated with this, Sadie is a healthy baby who has normal brain function and will have the same life span as you or I.”

Stone, of South Carolina, has continually posted updates on Sadie and new photos, as well as videos of the baby with her relatives. On Oct. 27, Stone shared a video of her mother singing a song called “Donguri Korokoro” to Sadie while she held her. Stone explained that Harmon used to sing the song to her as a child, and that it’s about an acorn and an eel. The video has racked up more than 8,600 views on Stone’s personal Facebook page, and has been covered by various news outlets.

“It really is special to watch her sing it to Sadie because I remember her signing it to me,” Stone told ABC News. “She would sing all these Japanese songs … when she would wash my hair in the shower. I thought it was pretty special that she can remember songs from way back when; over 30 years ago.”

 Stone told the news outlet that her daughter’s birth has inspired Harmon to do more and visit often.

“Sometimes my dad would have a hard time getting her here [to South Carolina.] But now they’ve been coming here every week,” Stone told the news outlet. “My dad will say, ‘Let’s go see Christine’s baby!’ And she comes excited.”

Stone said she hopes sharing the videos will help raise awareness for Alzheimer’s disease.



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